Off to the right start…

We all worry about different things during pregnancy, but I know a lot of people are wary of the chemicals in products available for self-care, baby care, cleaning and so on! We definitely are and we’re slowly, conscientiously changing our day to day practices to live not only healthier but also more eco-friendly lives. G’s ultimate goal is a fully eco-friendly house! While we’re a long way off that, we are making small steps through good cleaning products and re-usable EVERYTHING!

Preparing for baby to come though, I have struggled to find nappy creams and nipple creams that aren’t packed or at least dotted with chemicals. Even the best products available commercially come with additives I can’t pronounce. So we decided it would be a fun project to make our own creams!! All the ingredients are from the UK and they’re all edible too (I’ve been using the moisturiser as a lip balm and it’s brilliant!). We are experimenting with different butters, using Shea or Cocoa as a base, then mixing with Avocado and Mango butter, which are much softer and a bit more oily (particularly the Avo). Beeswax holds everything together and essential oils (optional) create lovely flavours.

Something I feel strongly about has been finding a good zinc-based cream as well! I use 100% zinc cream as sun protection as well as to soothe rashes or irritated skin. The health effects of zinc on skin are well-known and for this reason I have used pure zinc to create a barrier cream made from the same ingredients as the moisturiser. Again I am loving the effects!


If you would like to try some, get in touch using the form below. I have been using it now for 6 months all over our little girl as moisturiser and barrier cream, and for me when I pump and I love it. My partner uses it on his dry skin too!

All the ingredients are 100% natural and organic. Advice I’ve had from other mums about any nipple creams is to apply after breastfeeding and wipe off just before the next feed. This is particularly true if using the zinc cream, which provides a barrier for sore, cracked nipples. You will find it soothing but there’s no data on safe levels of ingestion for babies. So while it’s safe for nappy rashes, dry cracked skin, burns, etc, make sure you remove it prior to breastfeeding.

Finally, if you or your baby have any allergies or sensitive skin then please get in touch and I’ll do my best to help! If you are as anxious as I am then start small and test on a patch of skin for 12-24 hours before use.

Our ingredients

  • Shea butter
  • Avocado butter
  • Cocoa butter
  • Mango butter
  • Beeswax
  • Zinc to make a healing barrier cream

About Me

I am an anaesthetics trainee based in the UK and more importantly, a new mum trying to figure it all out!

I originally planned to make this cream just for myself then realised it would be great for other mums too! So I bought bulk and started cooking!

As you can see from our blog (halventures.wordpress.com), when we’re not working we spend our time sailing. We can’t wait to get cruising with a new member of the family so watch this space!



Contact

Get in Touch

@franification (Twitter / Instagram)
London, UK

Send Us a Message


Disclaimer: these creams were handmade in a non-sterile kitchen that contains nuts. They have not been tested medically and therefore the safety of these creams has not been determined. The moisturiser does not contain any medical ingredients, alcohols or petroleum. The barrier cream contains up to 20% by weight zinc oxide, which has medical properties. Rare side effects include rashes and allergic reactions. These products are for external use only.

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