I will never be able to pronounce these names. But in their own way they have a certain beauty. Even more so when written with the correct dots and lines and dashes. But first, a gorgeous sail:

All bundled up… 

And once safely(?) anchored in Straumoya, we fished, oh did we fish… I say we, all the hard work (fishing, filleting, cleaning) was done by J. 

And in close succession, she caught dinner for 12… 

We had a massive dinner of fried cod followed by baked cod followed by anything we could find that wasn’t cod! It was all beautifully fresh and delicious! Unfortunately our lovely sheltered anchorage wasn’t as sheltered as we’d hoped. So after an evening of drinking sloe gin and playing cards, we inspected for damage – no drift but some big gusts blowing through. Furthermore, we’d laid two anchors almost exactly perpendicular to the wind so there wasn’t even any hope of swinging unless one anchor didn’t hold. Which eventually is exactly what happened. We awoke around 2:30 am to some big gusts that just didn’t feel right. Cap’t Haddock wondered up on deck to check it out and popped his head back down 30 seconds later – get dressed, we’re almost on the rocks. Time to move on! 

This was our anchorage… 

Don’t be deceived apparently! We had some good gusts and dragged a couple 100 yards towards the rocky shore. 

Fortunately it was only a short burst to Nusfjord, a little village we’re getting to know well. We spent aaaages mooring up to the less than sturdy little dock, which is tied slightly precariously to the big wooden pillars lining the bay area. It was all very reminiscent of some of our moorings in Svalbard. After a couple of attempts though we figured we were safe and headed back to bed… 

The next morning after a lovely long sleep we toured the village, which has essentially been turned into a museum itself. All the old buildings were preserved in typical fashion of Nordic fishermen, particularly cod fishing. 

There was a boathouse, a smithy, a sawmill, a smokehouse all preserved for visitors. The general store / tourist shop was decorated with old-fashioned tins and food packaging. Then there is the cod museum, which showed how cod is caught and preserved by fishermen, a hundred years ago and now, all by hand. There was a lot of dried cod about too. 

Bundled up after a long coffee in the local cafe, we set off for our last night at sea. 

Last stop Reine!

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